It���s okay. You���re allowed to be wrong. – Gapingvoid

August 10, 2017

It’s okay. You’re allowed to be wrong.

Grown Up

 

It’s no wonder we’re afraid to be wrong.

As kids, being wrong meant lower scores on tests – which meant no college, which meant no job, which meant…

Well, we never let it get that far. We were too afraid.

Figuring out how to be wrong and live to tell the tale takes guts. Especially in the workplace. But it’s not just about what we’re willing to do — it’s about who’s around to support us.

That’s why we need to guarantee psychological safety for our teammates.

If we want people to make brave choices, we have to allow them to be wrong. A teammate who’s never secure in their position, or who feels like they have a foot out the door — that’s not who’s going to make your big choices and changes.

There’s no more detention or hall passes or whatever they used to threaten us with.

Now it’s just about doing things that make a difference.

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A Comparison of Five Free MOOC Platforms for Educators

A Comparison of Five Free MOOC Platforms for Educators

There are a number of good options for educators looking to build their own MOOCs. Here is a look at five of the most interesting platforms.

John Swope is the founder of curricu.me, an online MOOC aggregator that allows users to build and share custom curriculum with their students, employees and friends. His favorite MOOC is Dan Ariely’s “A Beginner’s Guide to Irrational Behavior,” and his personal blog takes much inspiration from Ariely’s theories around irrational economics. You can follow him on Twitter and Google+.

By the end of 2013, most top universities had started to offer some sort of MOOC (massive open online course). Now, we are starting to see the MOOC product move into both the corporate and the private realm. Companies like Google and Tenaris are using MOOCs for training their employees, MongoDB is educating developers through the MOOC medium and thousands of private instructors are teaching classes on sites like Udemy.

If you are considering a MOOC for yourself or your organization, you’ll first need to determine which tool you will use to build the course. The following is an assessment of five popular free MOOC (and MOOC-like) platforms.

MOOC Comparison

edX

EdX is an open-source platform offered by edX.org. It is the same platform that universities such as Harvard and MIT use to offer courses to 100,000+ students. It was released as open source in March 2013, and the goal was to act as the WordPress for MOOC platforms, allowing users to use plug-ins to expand the core functionality. edX has a fast, modern feel, with the ability to accommodate large enrollments.

edX is suitable for organizations that want a modern, flexible, robust course-management platform. Although it is open source, investment will need to be made in both installation and some maintenance. But the return will be a platform that can provide best-in-class content to thousands of students.

Moodle

Moodle is an open-source learning management system (LMS) that allows users to build and offer online courses. It was built for traditional online classrooms rather than MOOCs, which attract a large number of students. It tends to be easier to install than edX, and there are hosted or one-click install options available.

Moodle is suited for organizations that want a full-featured, customizable LMS. The platform offers more than edX in terms of educational tools, analytics and SCORM compliance. The trade-off is that the platform is over 10 years old. The number of configuration options can be daunting, and system performance suffers with larger numbers of students.

CourseSites by Blackboard

CourseSites by Blackboard is an exceptionally robust platform. It has most of the features that Moodle has, including extensive teaching tools, reporting features and SCORM compliance. It is also cloud-based. You can set up a course in minutes and never have to worry about maintenance or upgrades.

The service is free for up to five live courses, and Blackboard has given no indication that this will change. The trade-off seems to be that your courses are branded with the Blackboard logo, and your students must register with Blackboard in order to join a course.

CourseSites is a good option for individuals — for example, a teacher who wants to migrate part of a curriculum to an online format — or organizations looking to start experimenting with online courses without having to install anything . The five-course maximum and the inability to brand your course place limitations on how this platform can be applied. But with the lowest maintenance costs and the highest number of features, CourseSites is a good option.

Udemy (free version)

From the beginning, Udemy has specialized in the private MOOC. Think of it as the YouTube of MOOCs. Instructors can build and host their own courses on the platform and then offer them to users for free or for a fee.

Udemy is for individuals who want to easily build basic courses and monetize them. The platform is full of coders, photographers, designers and other specialists who offer their knowledge in the form of an online course. Udemy’s most distinct strength is its base of 2,000,000 registered students. When you build a course on Udemy, you are able to reach this pool of potential students.

Versal (free version)

Versal is an intriguing new platform. Its major strengths are a sleek, intuitive user interface and a robust drag-and-drop functionality. A user can sign up for free and then build a course that includes mathematical expressions, image drill-downs and many more widgets, all without any coding knowledge. Users can also embed their published courses on other websites, such as personal blogs.

Versal can’t fairly be called a MOOC platform, because it lacks certain MOOC elements. In particular, there is currently no forum or discussion functionality. Instead, it can be thought of as a strong tutorial platform.

Versal is most suited to individuals who want to quickly build sleek tutorials — for example, a teacher who builds an assignment for his students, or a musician who builds a short course on music theory and posts it on his or her blog. Versal is a young product, and the company is planning to develop some of the features that its platform currently lacks. This is one to keep an eye on.

Which platform you choose depends on what assumptions you make about your course. Most of these platforms offer demos on their site. It helps to be able to play around in a course and try to imagine your content with a similar look and feel. Finally, don’t worry about changing your mind early on. These platforms all rely on much of the same content (YouTube videos, PDFs, quizzes, etc), so it is easy to migrate a course halfway through the building process.





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How to Create the Perfect Infographic Infographic – e-Learning Infographics

Other Infographics

How to Create the Perfect Infographic Infographic

Posted on August 10, 2017

How to Create the Perfect Infographic Infographic

How to Create the Perfect Infographic Infographic

Infographics are powerful to communicate detailed information in a way that people can grasp quickly. However, you cannot just slap some images together, call it an infographic, and expect the page views to come pouring in. If you want to create a successful infographic, you have to follow a few different steps.

This infographic provide quick tips to create the perfect infographic that will be shared and read. It highlights simple best practices like: defining a goal, including a call-to-action, use a consistent color palette, and more.

Once you have created your infographic your work is only half done. You need to release it out into the world. There are three main tactics you can use to promote your creation.

See also:

Via: http://ift.tt/2wLuL0D


Embed This Education Infographic on your Site or Blog! Copy and Paste the following code!

 



The unbearable lightness of knowledge working – E-Learning Curve Blog

“In my view, organisational performance is highly dependent on worker ability and motivation”


1

The unbearable lightness of knowledge working

Here’s an interesting article that’s been rattling around the web for a while now, but worth revisiting: according to Jared Sandberg at the WSJ –

In the Information Age, so much is worked on in a day at the office but so little gets done. In the past, people could see the fruits of their labor immediately: a chair made or a ball bearing produced. But it can be hard to find gratification from work that is largely invisible, or from delivering goods that are often metaphorical. You can’t even leave your mark on a document in increasingly paperless offices. It can be even harder trying to measure it all.

Doing a job well provides tangible benefits

Doing a job well is gratifying and provides tangible benefits

In Ireland recently, a survey by the recruitment company Executive Connections suggested that most people in the job market are on the move not, as you might imagine for greater remuneration, but because of a perceived lack of career progression and satisfaction with their current role; people really do have an inherent need for, and are motivated by responsibilities in their job.

As learning practitioners – and particularly in e-learning – we’re aware of the importance of motivating and rewarding learners. Many of us have first-hand experience of the numbingly dull exercise of proceeding through linear old skool CBT-style courseware. We try to design, develop, and deliver engaging and interactive  experiences that will reward our learners, or at least evoke a degree of satisfaction when they accomplish a task or successfully complete an activity, and we also know about the statistics of the high drop-out rates for e-learning programmes.

I’m wondering if there’s a relationship between these two phenomena? In my view, organisational performance is highly dependent on worker ability and motivation.

Ability depends on educational development, experience, and training; developing this facility is an ongoing process that doesn’t reap immediate rewards. However, motivation can be improved quickly. As a guideline, there are broadly seven strategies for motivation.

  • Positive reinforcement / high expectations
  • Effective discipline and punishment
  • Treating people fairly
  • Satisfying employees needs
  • Setting work related goals
  • Restructuring jobs
  • Base rewards on job performance

These are the basic strategies, though the mix varies from situation to situation/workplace to workplace. In the under- or unmotivated worker (including those who drop out of e-learning courses for example) we can say that there is a disconnect between an individuals actual state and some desired state: so how do we resolve this disconnect, and ultimately support knowledge workers find increased psychological satisfaction in their professional endeavours?

Answers on a postcard please.

References:

Sandberg, J. (2008) A Modern Conundrum: When Work’s Invisible, So Are Its Satisfactions. The Wall Street Journal [Internet]. Available from: http://ift.tt/RXNABi
SB120338000214975633.html?mod=psp_editors_picks
[Accessed 12th July 2017]

Related

Social networks, long tails, social tiesJuly 19, 2017In “E-Learning”

The Problem of KnowledgeSeptember 30, 2010In “E-Learning”

Irish Learning Showcase 2010 in DublinJuly 16, 2010In “E-Learning”

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Make yourself irreplaceable – Gapingvoid

Don’t offer criticism – bring solutions.


August 9, 2017

Make yourself irreplaceable

genius is random work ethic isn't

 

How much do you care about what you do?

That’s what matters. That’s the killer metric.

Smart is good. Great, even. But what people remember, more than ideas, is action.

Don’t wait to be told what to do – come up with the plan.

Don’t offer criticism – bring solutions.

Keep the bottom line at the front of your decisions. Embrace risk, embrace change. Keep promises. Ignore distractions – and distractors.

Be someone people need to have around.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comment


 

Not signed in

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Make yourself irreplaceable – Gapingvoid

Don’t offer criticism – bring solutions.


August 9, 2017

Make yourself irreplaceable

genius is random work ethic isn't

 

How much do you care about what you do?

That’s what matters. That’s the killer metric.

Smart is good. Great, even. But what people remember, more than ideas, is action.

Don’t wait to be told what to do – come up with the plan.

Don’t offer criticism – bring solutions.

Keep the bottom line at the front of your decisions. Embrace risk, embrace change. Keep promises. Ignore distractions – and distractors.

Be someone people need to have around.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comment


 

Not signed in

Name *

Email *

Website


Using Learning Curves

How it takes more time to master the Bloom top levels.


1

Using Learning Curves

In the introduction to my previous E-Learning Curve Blog post, focussing on the topic of learning curves, I referenced the axiom that ‘practice makes perfect’ – the concept that the acquisition and improvement of new skills, knowledge or expertise are broadly predicated upon the learner’s facility and willingness to rehearse and become more proficient in the tasks or activities being practised.

This is not news. We have all experienced this process, and Behaviorists would venture to assert that perhaps we know it intuitively. What may be more surprising is that the rate and shape of improvement of learning can be described geometrically on a curve.

The concept of the learning curve illustrates a simplified model of learning in which knowledge of a given subject is acquired through a progression of steps. Figure 1 shows a model of an idealized (and simplified, and in no way scientifically nor pedagogically accurate) learning curve applied to Bloom’s Taxonomy. At the lowest levels of the curve, the learner is a novice who then progresses through the various stages of cognitive development, where at each stage they increase in competency until (perhaps up to a decade and / or 10,000 practice hours later) they become an expert, with an overarching competency in the domian being studied.

Figure 1. Bloom’s Taxonomy charted on a learning curve

The learning curve has substantial implications for e-learning: it suggests that practice always helps improve performance, but that the most dramatic improvements happen first, with smaller and smaller incremental improvements being accrued over time. Another implication is that with sufficient practice, learners can achieve comparable levels of performance. For example, extensive practice on mental arithmetic (Staszewski, reported in Delaney et al., 1998) and on digit memorization have turned average individuals into high performers in the discipline.

The learning curve was devised from the historical observation that individuals who perform repetitive tasks demonstrate an improvement in performance as the task is repeated over time. It was first studied empirically in the 1930’s by T. P. Wright. In his text Factors Affecting the Cost of Airplanes, Wright drew three conclusions upon which the current theory and practice surrounding learning curves are based:

  1. The time required to perform a task decreases as the task is repeated
  2. The amount of improvement decreases as more units are produced
  3. The rate of improvement has sufficient consistency to allow its use as a prediction tool

In this study, Wright concluded

that consistency in improvement has been found to exist in the form of a constant percentage reduction in time required over successively doubled quantities of units produced. The constant percentage by which the costs of doubled quantities decrease is called the Rate of Learning.

More…

_________

References:

Delaney, P. F., Reder, L. M., Staszewski, J. J., & Ritter, F. E. (1998). The strategy specific nature of improvement: The power law applies by strategy within task. Psychological Science, 9(1), 1-8.

Wright, T.P. (1936). Factors Affecting the Cost of Airplanes. Journal of Aeronautical Sciences, 3.4 : 122 -128. [Internet] Available from: http://ift.tt/2usEFmK Accessed August 1 2017

Related

The Long Tail, the 80:20 Rule and the role of learning professionalsJuly 24, 2017In “E-Learning”

Experiential Workplace LearningApril 6, 2010In “E-Learning”

A Holistic Approach to Workplace CompetenciesMarch 3, 2010In “E-Learning”

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