Make yourself irreplaceable – Gapingvoid

Don’t offer criticism – bring solutions.


August 9, 2017

Make yourself irreplaceable

genius is random work ethic isn't

 

How much do you care about what you do?

That’s what matters. That’s the killer metric.

Smart is good. Great, even. But what people remember, more than ideas, is action.

Don’t wait to be told what to do – come up with the plan.

Don’t offer criticism – bring solutions.

Keep the bottom line at the front of your decisions. Embrace risk, embrace change. Keep promises. Ignore distractions – and distractors.

Be someone people need to have around.

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Make yourself irreplaceable – Gapingvoid

Don’t offer criticism – bring solutions.


August 9, 2017

Make yourself irreplaceable

genius is random work ethic isn't

 

How much do you care about what you do?

That’s what matters. That’s the killer metric.

Smart is good. Great, even. But what people remember, more than ideas, is action.

Don’t wait to be told what to do – come up with the plan.

Don’t offer criticism – bring solutions.

Keep the bottom line at the front of your decisions. Embrace risk, embrace change. Keep promises. Ignore distractions – and distractors.

Be someone people need to have around.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comment


 

Not signed in

Name *

Email *

Website


Using Learning Curves

How it takes more time to master the Bloom top levels.


1

Using Learning Curves

In the introduction to my previous E-Learning Curve Blog post, focussing on the topic of learning curves, I referenced the axiom that ‘practice makes perfect’ – the concept that the acquisition and improvement of new skills, knowledge or expertise are broadly predicated upon the learner’s facility and willingness to rehearse and become more proficient in the tasks or activities being practised.

This is not news. We have all experienced this process, and Behaviorists would venture to assert that perhaps we know it intuitively. What may be more surprising is that the rate and shape of improvement of learning can be described geometrically on a curve.

The concept of the learning curve illustrates a simplified model of learning in which knowledge of a given subject is acquired through a progression of steps. Figure 1 shows a model of an idealized (and simplified, and in no way scientifically nor pedagogically accurate) learning curve applied to Bloom’s Taxonomy. At the lowest levels of the curve, the learner is a novice who then progresses through the various stages of cognitive development, where at each stage they increase in competency until (perhaps up to a decade and / or 10,000 practice hours later) they become an expert, with an overarching competency in the domian being studied.

Figure 1. Bloom’s Taxonomy charted on a learning curve

The learning curve has substantial implications for e-learning: it suggests that practice always helps improve performance, but that the most dramatic improvements happen first, with smaller and smaller incremental improvements being accrued over time. Another implication is that with sufficient practice, learners can achieve comparable levels of performance. For example, extensive practice on mental arithmetic (Staszewski, reported in Delaney et al., 1998) and on digit memorization have turned average individuals into high performers in the discipline.

The learning curve was devised from the historical observation that individuals who perform repetitive tasks demonstrate an improvement in performance as the task is repeated over time. It was first studied empirically in the 1930’s by T. P. Wright. In his text Factors Affecting the Cost of Airplanes, Wright drew three conclusions upon which the current theory and practice surrounding learning curves are based:

  1. The time required to perform a task decreases as the task is repeated
  2. The amount of improvement decreases as more units are produced
  3. The rate of improvement has sufficient consistency to allow its use as a prediction tool

In this study, Wright concluded

that consistency in improvement has been found to exist in the form of a constant percentage reduction in time required over successively doubled quantities of units produced. The constant percentage by which the costs of doubled quantities decrease is called the Rate of Learning.

More…

_________

References:

Delaney, P. F., Reder, L. M., Staszewski, J. J., & Ritter, F. E. (1998). The strategy specific nature of improvement: The power law applies by strategy within task. Psychological Science, 9(1), 1-8.

Wright, T.P. (1936). Factors Affecting the Cost of Airplanes. Journal of Aeronautical Sciences, 3.4 : 122 -128. [Internet] Available from: http://ift.tt/2usEFmK Accessed August 1 2017

Related

The Long Tail, the 80:20 Rule and the role of learning professionalsJuly 24, 2017In “E-Learning”

Experiential Workplace LearningApril 6, 2010In “E-Learning”

A Holistic Approach to Workplace CompetenciesMarch 3, 2010In “E-Learning”

.

.


Using Learning Curves

How it takes more time to master the Bloom top levels.


1

Using Learning Curves

In the introduction to my previous E-Learning Curve Blog post, focussing on the topic of learning curves, I referenced the axiom that ‘practice makes perfect’ – the concept that the acquisition and improvement of new skills, knowledge or expertise are broadly predicated upon the learner’s facility and willingness to rehearse and become more proficient in the tasks or activities being practised.

This is not news. We have all experienced this process, and Behaviorists would venture to assert that perhaps we know it intuitively. What may be more surprising is that the rate and shape of improvement of learning can be described geometrically on a curve.

The concept of the learning curve illustrates a simplified model of learning in which knowledge of a given subject is acquired through a progression of steps. Figure 1 shows a model of an idealized (and simplified, and in no way scientifically nor pedagogically accurate) learning curve applied to Bloom’s Taxonomy. At the lowest levels of the curve, the learner is a novice who then progresses through the various stages of cognitive development, where at each stage they increase in competency until (perhaps up to a decade and / or 10,000 practice hours later) they become an expert, with an overarching competency in the domian being studied.

Figure 1. Bloom’s Taxonomy charted on a learning curve

The learning curve has substantial implications for e-learning: it suggests that practice always helps improve performance, but that the most dramatic improvements happen first, with smaller and smaller incremental improvements being accrued over time. Another implication is that with sufficient practice, learners can achieve comparable levels of performance. For example, extensive practice on mental arithmetic (Staszewski, reported in Delaney et al., 1998) and on digit memorization have turned average individuals into high performers in the discipline.

The learning curve was devised from the historical observation that individuals who perform repetitive tasks demonstrate an improvement in performance as the task is repeated over time. It was first studied empirically in the 1930’s by T. P. Wright. In his text Factors Affecting the Cost of Airplanes, Wright drew three conclusions upon which the current theory and practice surrounding learning curves are based:

  1. The time required to perform a task decreases as the task is repeated
  2. The amount of improvement decreases as more units are produced
  3. The rate of improvement has sufficient consistency to allow its use as a prediction tool

In this study, Wright concluded

that consistency in improvement has been found to exist in the form of a constant percentage reduction in time required over successively doubled quantities of units produced. The constant percentage by which the costs of doubled quantities decrease is called the Rate of Learning.

More…

_________

References:

Delaney, P. F., Reder, L. M., Staszewski, J. J., & Ritter, F. E. (1998). The strategy specific nature of improvement: The power law applies by strategy within task. Psychological Science, 9(1), 1-8.

Wright, T.P. (1936). Factors Affecting the Cost of Airplanes. Journal of Aeronautical Sciences, 3.4 : 122 -128. [Internet] Available from: http://ift.tt/2usEFmK Accessed August 1 2017

Related

The Long Tail, the 80:20 Rule and the role of learning professionalsJuly 24, 2017In “E-Learning”

Experiential Workplace LearningApril 6, 2010In “E-Learning”

A Holistic Approach to Workplace CompetenciesMarch 3, 2010In “E-Learning”

.

.


Alternatives to YouTube’s Video Editor – It’s Going Away


Google
 

Web

freetech4teachers.com

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Monday, August 7, 2017

Alternatives to YouTube’s Video Editor – It’s Going Away

Earlier this summer Google announced that the YouTube video editor will be “going away” on September 20th. Since then I have fielded many requests to suggest alternatives to the YouTube video editor. Here’s a run-down of the recommendations that I have been making.

YouTube enhancements are not going away. 
It’s important to note that if you have only been using the YouTube video editor for things like cropping the length of your video or applying visual filters, you will still be able to do that in your YouTube account. Trimming the length of a video, adding interactive end screens, blurring faces and objects, and applying color filters are all considered part of the “enhancements” that you can apply to your videos. Those features are not going away.

YouTube Photo Slideshow Alternatives:
YouTube’s photo slideshow creator was a nice tool that let you pull images from your desktop or from your Google account, drag them into a sequence, then add music from a library of more 100,000 Creative Commons-licensed music tracks. Fortunately, there is not a shortage of websites and apps that offer the same features.

Stupeflix, Sharalike, and Animoto all let you import a batch of pictures and add music to quickly create an audio slideshow. Animoto and Stupeflix both let you add text over your images while Sharalike does not. Sharalike, however, allows for much longer videos than Animoto and Stupeflix will create. Sharalike and Animoto offer iOS and Android apps while Stupeflix does not. Finally, Animoto and Stupeflix offer free education versions for teachers.


Basic Video Editing:
iOS and MacOS users have access to iMovie for free now. If you’re looking for a video editor for your students to use on iPads or Macs, iMovie is more than adequate for the vast majority of classroom projects.

Windows users can still use Windows Movie Maker. Microsoft is not officially supporting it on Windows 10, but you can still download it and use it on Windows 10 computers. But later this year Microsoft will be releasing Story Mix which is essentially the replacement for Movie Maker. This video provides a preview of Story Mix.

Chromebook users and those who cannot install software should look into Adobe Spark and WeVideo. Adobe Spark is free to use. You can upload images and videos to use in your final product. Adobe Spark will let you record narration on a scene-by-scene basis by simply holding a record button while you talk. I have some tutorials on Adobe Spark that you can watch here and here.

WeVideo offers a robust web-based video editing tool that rivals the features you can find in iMovie. The limitation of WeVideo is that in order to access its best features like voiceover, green screen, and high resolution production you will have to purchase a subscription. School pricing starts at $199/ year for 30 seats.

Links to this post

Create a Link

Disclosures and Policies

FreeTech4Teachers.com is owned by Byrne Instructional Media, LLC.

Click here to read full disclosures and policies regarding Free Technology for Teachers.

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Alternatives to YouTube’s Video Editor – It’s Going Away


Google
 

Web

freetech4teachers.com

EdTechAdFinal

Monday, August 7, 2017

Alternatives to YouTube’s Video Editor – It’s Going Away

Earlier this summer Google announced that the YouTube video editor will be “going away” on September 20th. Since then I have fielded many requests to suggest alternatives to the YouTube video editor. Here’s a run-down of the recommendations that I have been making.

YouTube enhancements are not going away. 
It’s important to note that if you have only been using the YouTube video editor for things like cropping the length of your video or applying visual filters, you will still be able to do that in your YouTube account. Trimming the length of a video, adding interactive end screens, blurring faces and objects, and applying color filters are all considered part of the “enhancements” that you can apply to your videos. Those features are not going away.

YouTube Photo Slideshow Alternatives:
YouTube’s photo slideshow creator was a nice tool that let you pull images from your desktop or from your Google account, drag them into a sequence, then add music from a library of more 100,000 Creative Commons-licensed music tracks. Fortunately, there is not a shortage of websites and apps that offer the same features.

Stupeflix, Sharalike, and Animoto all let you import a batch of pictures and add music to quickly create an audio slideshow. Animoto and Stupeflix both let you add text over your images while Sharalike does not. Sharalike, however, allows for much longer videos than Animoto and Stupeflix will create. Sharalike and Animoto offer iOS and Android apps while Stupeflix does not. Finally, Animoto and Stupeflix offer free education versions for teachers.


Basic Video Editing:
iOS and MacOS users have access to iMovie for free now. If you’re looking for a video editor for your students to use on iPads or Macs, iMovie is more than adequate for the vast majority of classroom projects.

Windows users can still use Windows Movie Maker. Microsoft is not officially supporting it on Windows 10, but you can still download it and use it on Windows 10 computers. But later this year Microsoft will be releasing Story Mix which is essentially the replacement for Movie Maker. This video provides a preview of Story Mix.

Chromebook users and those who cannot install software should look into Adobe Spark and WeVideo. Adobe Spark is free to use. You can upload images and videos to use in your final product. Adobe Spark will let you record narration on a scene-by-scene basis by simply holding a record button while you talk. I have some tutorials on Adobe Spark that you can watch here and here.

WeVideo offers a robust web-based video editing tool that rivals the features you can find in iMovie. The limitation of WeVideo is that in order to access its best features like voiceover, green screen, and high resolution production you will have to purchase a subscription. School pricing starts at $199/ year for 30 seats.

Links to this post

Create a Link

Disclosures and Policies

FreeTech4Teachers.com is owned by Byrne Instructional Media, LLC.

Click here to read full disclosures and policies regarding Free Technology for Teachers.

Powered by Blogger.


Tinderbox: The Tool For Notes

Tinderbox 7

A new era for Tinderbox: the tool for notes. Tinderbox 7 is faster, more expressive, and more helpful than ever – the invaluable tool for capturing and visualizing your ideas.

  • Composites build big ideas from small notes
  • Gorgeous new fonts make your work even more legible
  • Quick links connect notes instantly
  • Hundreds of improvements

Whether you’re plotting your next thriller or writing your dissertation, designing a course, managing a legal practice, coordinating a campaign or planning a season of orchestral concerts, Tinderbox 7 will be your personal information assistant.


Now available: Tinderbox 7.1.0


The Tool For Notes

screenshot

Tinderbox stores and organizes your notes, plans, and ideas. It can help you analyze and understand them today, tomorrow, and over the coming months and years.

You can build Tinderbox documents that help organize themselves and that keep your data clean. We believe in information gardening: as your understanding grows, Tinderbox grows with you.

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VISUAL

Tinderbox maps your notes as you make them. Build relationships by arranging notes, organizing them with shape and color, and linking them. Tinderbox lets you record ideas quickly and keep them where you’ll find them again when you need them.

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SMART

Tinderbox gives you maps, timelines, charts, outlines, and more . View your notes from lots of perspectives.

Tinderbox notes can have prototypes, saving you time and keeping your work organized. A note is just like its prototype — except when you’ve said it’s different. Change the prototype, and the change is inherited instantly.

Attribute browser tabs give you a cross-section of your work or of selected portions, broken down by the category of your choice.

screenshot

ATTENTIVE

Tinderbox agents scan your notes continuously, searching for notes that meet your criteria. Agents can look for tasks that are overdue, or notes you need to complete, or topics that you find especially interesting. Tinderbox can automatically update notes from the internet, the cloud, or your DEVONthink Pro repository.

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SWIFT

Tinderbox handles thousands of notes with ease, and Tinderbox is fast. Want to make a note? Just type! Want to edit a note? Just click. Need to search? Tinderbox starts looking for the answer as soon as you start typing, and often finds your answer before you finish.

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TIMELY

Tinderbox’s timeline view creates wonderful, interactive diagrams to reconstruct events and plan projects.

STANDARD

With Tinderbox, your data is yours. Tinderbox files are XML, and Tinderbox can create HTML, XML, RSS, OPML, and more. Tinderbox shares notes with Simplenote for Web and iPhone access.

Tinderbox export is unequalled in flexibility. Everything is stored on your own computer: you aren’t dependent on a distant server. Write anytime: on airplanes, in cafés, at home or away.

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ACTIVE

Tinderbox is a deep program with an active and friendly user community. The Tinderbox Forum and Tinderbox Wiki host ongoing discussions and tutorials. Tinderbox weekends – held throughout the US and Europe – bring Tinderbox users together to share ideas and to explore Tinderbox with the developers in person. Application notes and case studies explore uses of Tinderbox from Forensic Psychiatry to writing musical comedy. The Tinderbox Public File Exchange hosts a range of templates, assistants, and samples. You can arrange private Tinderbox training for you and your team.

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PERSONAL

Tinderbox is personal. It works the way you want, and adapts gracefully as your needs change. It’s small and agile, so you can get started right away, but it’s got the power you’ll need to handle all your notes.

Your Tinderbox agents work constantly to keep things organized. A rich portfolio of views — maps, charts, outlines, and more — keeps you in touch with your information. Work the way you want.

FRIENDLY

The Tinderbox community is a fascinating gathering of people doing amazing work. Have questions about getting started with Tinderbox? Need help designing a tricky agent? Look at the fascinating user screencasts, or drop by the Tinderbox Forum.

There’s even a backstage program for people who want a front row seat for future Tinderbox development.